Summers County Board of Education Policy

Adopted:  9/9/83  Rev. 7/23/03                                                                                                                   Code:  VI-D-4

Reference:  WV Code:  18-5-18b                                                                                                                

Summers County Developmental Guidance and Counseling Policy

  1. General
    1. Scope Ė This policy sets the requirements for Pre-K-12 comprehensive developmental guidance and counseling programs for schools in Summers county that reflect the American School Counselor Association National Standards for School Counseling Programs model.
    2. Authority ____________________
    3. Effective Date ________________
  1. Purpose
    1. The purpose of this policy is to define the components of a comprehensive and developmental guidance and counseling program based on nationally recognized standards, as well as define the direct and indirect counseling services and counseling program service delivery and monitoring guidelines that are to be reflected in the Summers County policy and to be implemented at each school. The nine national standards for school counseling defined in ß126-67-4 and ß126-67-7 of the state policy link the comprehensive and developmental guidance and counseling program to the county/school academic mission by promoting an integral part of the total educational program, and by helping assure a nurturing and orderly, safe, drug-free, violence and harassment free learning environment.
  2. Application
    1. Summers County and all schools in Summers County will establish and implement comprehensive developmental guidance and counseling programs designed to impart specific skills and learning opportunities in a proactive, preventive manner, ensuring that every student can achieve school success through academic, career, and personal/social development experiences.
    2. The school guidance and counseling program is comprehensive in scope, developmental in nature based on the national standards for school counseling programs and is delivered by counselors, both individually and in collaboration with other professionals and through programs and activities to every Summers County student in grades Pre-K-12.
    3. Developmental school guidance and counseling is for all students, has an organized and planned curriculum, is sequential and flexible, is an integrated part of the total educational process, involves all school personnel, helps students learn more effectively and efficiently, and includes counseling that integrates developmental perspectives that are both age appropriate and issue specific.
  3. Definitions
    1. Advocacy. Advocacy refers to the active support of causes, ideas or policies that promote and assist student academic, career, personal/social needs. One form of advocacy is the process of actively identifying under-represented students and supporting them in their efforts to perform at their highest level of academic achievement
    2. Collaboration. Collaboration is a partnership in which two or more individuals or organizations actively work together on a project or problem.
    3. Comprehensive school guidance and counseling curriculum. The comprehensive school guidance and counseling curriculum component consists of structured developmental lessons designed to assist students in achieving the competencies and is presented systematically through classroom and group activities in grades Pre-K-12.
    4. Comprehensive school guidance and counseling program. This program is an integral part of the total educational program that helps every student acquire the skills, knowledge and attitudes in the areas of academic, career and personal/social development that promotes academic achievement and meet developmental needs.
    5. Consultation. Consultation refers to a process in which counselors consult with parents or guardians, teachers, or other educators and community agencies regarding strategies to help students and families. School counselors serve as student advocates.
    6. Counseling. Counseling refers to a special type of helping process implemented by a professionally trained and certified person, involving a variety of techniques and strategies that help students explore academic, career, and personal/social issues impeding healthy development or academic growth.
    7. Counseling-related administrative activities. These activities include: developing and implementing counseling-related events such as orientation and transition programs, financial aid workshops, career and college planning processes, developmental guidance activities, preventive-focused programs such as but not limited to Peer Mediator, Natural Helpers, and other student centered activities; writing letters of recommendation; and coordinating with appropriate school officials to assure the maintenance of student records. Counseling activities of a clerical nature such as data entry, the filing of student records and forms and the duplication of documents and materials for distribution when combined with counseling-related administrative activities, should not exceed more than 25% of the counselorís time.
    8. Crisis Counseling. Crisis counseling provides prevention, intervention and follow-up. Counseling and support are provided to students and families facing emergency situations. Such counseling is normally short term and temporary in nature, and usually results in a referral made to appropriate community resources. School counselors may provide a leadership role in the school districtís crisis intervention team process.
    9. Individual and small-group counseling. Counseling is provided in a small group or on an individual basis for students expressing difficulties dealing with relationships, personal concerns or normal developmental tasks. Individual and small-group counseling helps students identify problems, causes, alternatives and possible consequences in order for appropriate action to be taken. Such counseling is normally short term in nature. When necessary, referrals are made to appropriate community resources.
    10. National standards for school counseling. The nine National Standards for School Counseling are organized in three categories of student development: academic, career, and personal/social. These standards provide guidance and direction for states, school systems and individual schools to develop quality and effective school counseling program. Each of the nine standards includes a list of student competencies that enumerate the desired student learning outcomes. The student competencies define the specific knowledge, attitudes and skills that students should obtain or demonstrate as a result of participating in a school-counseling program.
    11. Non-Counseling activities. Non- Counseling activities are any activity or duty not related to the development, implementation or evaluation of the counseling program such as but not limited to recording health information on permanent records; non counseling related field trips; coordinate the collection of homework assignments for students who are absent; perform any duties that puts a counselor in the role of a disciplinarian such as but not limited to bus duty, lunch duty, detention hall; administer discipline; substitute or cover classes for planning for teachers on a frequent or regular basis.
    12. Peer facilitation. A technique in which counselors train students as peer helpers/mediators, conflict managers, tutors and mentors.
    13. Program audit. A program audit refers to the assessment of the school counseling program on the components of the American School Counselor Association National Model; the primary purpose for collecting information is to guide future action within the program and to improve future results for students.
    14. West Virginia Comprehensive Developmental Guidance and Counseling Program Guide. This program guide describes West Virginia comprehensive developmental guidance and counseling program model and outlines a process for tailoring the model to meet the needs of individual West Virginia districts and schools.
  4. Components of a comprehensive developmental guidance and counseling program addressed by Summers County.
    1. Guidance Curriculum
        1. The guidance curriculum component consists of structured developmental lessons designed to assist students in achieving the competencies and is presented systematically through classroom and group activities in grades Pre-K-12. The curriculum is to provide all students the knowledge and skills appropriate for their developmental levels. Guidance lessons may refer to topics such as but not limited to conflict resolution, life skills, character education, personal/social skills, drug/violence prevention, bullying, and a responsible student program.
        2. The guidance curriculum will be delivered using a collaborative model involving the school counselor, classroom teachers and other appropriate education professionals.
        3. The curriculum will be implemented based on: data collected on attendance, grades, and discipline from the WVEIS system; surveyís completed by students; and research.
    2. Individual Planning with Students
        1. The individual planning component consists of school counselorís coordination ongoing systemic activities designed to assist the individual student in establishing personal goals and developing future plans. Activities such as but not limited to helping students become aware to the differences between elementary school and middle school; development of the five year academic plan based on the two year and three year plan, individual student academic advising; the interpretation and application of assessment information in a meaningful way to guide academic program planning.
        2. Parents and other school staff will be involved in the individual planning with students in order to set goals and develop pathways to realize academic, career and personal/social aspirations.
    3. Responsive Services
        1. The responsive services component consists of activities to meet studentís immediate needs. Responsive services may be provided in a direct format through individual and group counseling, including crisis counseling or indirectly through consultation, peer facilitation or outside referral. Frequently dominated by presenting student issues or school building, community and parental concerns, responsive services may address such topics but not limited to peer pressure, conflict resolution, family relationships, personal identity issues, grief and loss, suicide, child abuse, substance abuse, school dropout prevention and motivation and achievement concerns.
        2. The responsive services provided by the school counselor for students with a severe crisis are usually short term and temporary in nature with the school counselorís area of responsibility being to refer the student to an appropriate community resource/agency. And to serve in a consultative capacity between the resource/agency and the school to assure consistent delivery of services.
        3. The school counselor may also assume a major role in developing and serving on a school/community crisis response team.
    4. Systems support

6.4.1. The systems support component consists of the professional development, consultation, collaboration and teaming; and program management and operation activities that establish, maintain and enhance the total school-counseling program. School counselors will serve on the Student Assistance Team, curriculum
committee and Responsible Students Program committee; provide or receive professional development based on areas of need; collaborate with teachers or other professional staff in relation to studentís needs; organize the counseling program, or evaluate the counseling program.

6.4.2. Counselors will be involved in facilitating discussions on school improvement, examination of data that impacts the success of various groups of students and in professional development activities for faculty and staff through the LEA, faculty senate meetings, conducting workshops and being a team member on school committees.

  1. Counseling program services, program monitoring, counselor qualifications and recommended counselor time distribution.

6.1. Counselors will spend at least 75% of their time in a direct counseling/intervention related activities with pupils and devote no more than 25% of their time to counselor-related administrative activities and counseling activities of a clerical nature.

6.2. School counselors are highly qualified as demonstrated by the possession of masterís degree in school counseling and a school counseling certificate valid in West Virginia.

    1. Student growth and development is monitored by the achievement of student competencies found in the National Standards for School Counseling and by the demonstration of positive results in the area of school improvement data.

6.4. Distribution of the total school counselor time.

Delivery System Component Elementary School Middle School High School

% of time % of time % of time

Guidance Curriculum 35%-40% 25%-35% 15%-25%

Individual Student Planning 5%-10% 15%-25% 25%-35%

Responsive Services 30%-40% 30%-40% 25%-35%

System Support 10%-15% 10%-15% 15%-20%

7. Guidance and counseling program content standards and student competencies.

The county/school will focus annually on student needs based on identified specific student competencies, determined through a process that includes a needs assessment or a review of county/school data in order to develop priorities for the year.

    1. Academic development. The content standards for academic development guide the school counseling program to implement strategies and activities to support and enable students to experience academic success, maximize learning through commitment, produce high quality work, and be prepared for a full range of options and opportunities after high school. The academic development area includes the acquisition of skills in decision-making, problem solving and goal setting, critical thinking, logical reasoning and interpersonal communication and application of these skills to academic achievement. The school counseling program enables all students to achieve success in school and to develop into contributing members of society. Academic development content standards are:

7.1.1. Standard 1: Students will acquire the attitudes, knowledge and skills that contribute to effective learning in school and across the life span. Examples of student competencies associated with this standard may include, but are not limited to:

      1. Students will articulate feelings of competence and confidence as learners.
      2. Students will display a positive interest in learning.
      3. Students will take pride in work and achievement.
      4. Students will accept mistakes as essential to the learning process.
      5. Students will identify attitudes and behaviors that lead to successful learning.
      6. Students will apply time management and task management skills.
      7. Students will demonstrate how effort and persistence positively affect learning.
      8. Students will use communication skills to know when and how to ask for help when needed.
      9. Students will apply knowledge of learning styles to positively influence school performance.
      10. Students will take responsibility for their actions.
      11. Students will demonstrate the ability to work independently and cooperatively with other students.
      12. Students will develop a broad range of interests and abilities.
      13. Students will demonstrate dependability, productivity, and initiative.
      14. Students will share knowledge.
      1. Standard 2: Students will complete school with the academic preparation essential to choose from a wide range of substantial post-secondary options, including college. Examples of student competencies associated with this standard may include, but are not limited to:
      1. Students will demonstrate the motivation to achieve individual potential.
      2. Students will learn and apply critical thinking skills.
      3. Students will apply the study skills necessary for academic success at each level.
      4. Students will seek information and support from faculty, staff, family and peers.
      5. Students will organize and apply academic information from a variety of sources.
      6. Students will use knowledge of learning styles to positively influence school performance.
      7. Students will become self-directed and independent learners.
      8. Students will establish challenging academic goals in elementary, middle/junior high and high school.
      9. Students will use assessment results in educational planning.
      10. Students will develop and implement an annual plan of study to maximize academic ability and achievement.
      11. Students will apply knowledge of aptitudes and interests to goal setting.
      12. Students will use problem-solving and decision-making skills to assess progress toward educational goals.
      13. Students will understand the relationship between classroom performance and success in school.
      14. Students will identify post-secondary options consistent with interests, achievement, aptitude and abilities.
      1. Standard 3: Students will understand the relationship of academics to the world of work and to life at home and in the community. Examples of student competencies associated with this standard may include, but are not limited to:
      1. Students will demonstrate the ability to balance school, studies, extracurricular activities, leisure time and family life.
      2. Student will seek co-curricular and community experiences to enhance the school experience.
      3. Students will understand the relationship between learning and work.
      4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the value of lifelong learning as essential to seeking, obtaining, and maintaining life goals.
      5. Students will understand that school success is the preparation to make the transition from student to community member.
      6. Students will understand how school success and academic achievement enhance future career and vocational opportunities.

7.2. Career Development. The content standards for career development guide the school counseling program to provide the foundation for the acquisition of skills, attitudes, and knowledge enabling students to make a successful transition from school to the world of work and from job to job across the life career span. The career content standards are:

      1. Standard 4: Students will acquire the skills to investigate the world of work in relation to knowledge of self and to make informed career decisions. Examples of student competencies associated with this standard may include, but are not limited to:
      1. Students will develop skills to locate, evaluate and interpret career information.
      2. Students will learn about the variety of traditional and nontraditional occupations.
      3. Students will develop an awareness of personal abilities, skills, interests, and motivations.
      4. Students will learn how to interact and work cooperatively in teams.
      5. Students will learn to make decisions.
      6. Students will learn how to set goals.
      7. Students will understand the importance of planning.
      8. Students will pursue and develop competency in areas of interest.
      9. Students will develop vocational interests.
      10. Students will learn to balance work and leisure time.
      11. Students will acquire employability skills such as working on a team, problem solving, and organizational skills.
      12. Students will apply job readiness skills to seek employment opportunities.
      13. Students will demonstrate knowledge about the changing workplace.
      14. Students will learn about the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees.
      15. Students will learn to respect individual uniqueness in the workplace.
      16. Students will learn how to write a resume.
      17. Students will develop a positive attitude toward work and learning.
      18. Students will understand the importance of responsibility, dependability, punctuality, integrity and effort in the workplace.
      19. Students will utilize time and task management skills.
      1. Standard 5: Students will employ strategies to achieve future career success and satisfaction. Examples of student competencies associated with this standards may include, but are not limited to:
      1. Students will apply decision-making skills to career planning, course selection, and career transitions.
      2. Students will identify personal skills, interests, and abilities and relate them to current career choices.
      3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of career planning process.
      4. Students will know the various ways which occupations can be classified.
      5. Students will use research and information resources to obtain career information.
      6. Students will learn to use the Internet to access career planning information.
      7. Students will describe traditional and nontraditional occupations and how these relate to career choice.
      8. Students will understand how changing economic and societal needs influence employment trends and future training.
      9. Students will demonstrate awareness of the education and training needed to achieve career goals.
      10. Students will assess and modify their educational plans to support career goals.
      11. Students will use employability and job readiness skills in internship, mentoring, shadowing and/or other world of work experiences.
      12. Students will select coursework that is related to career interests.
      13. Students will maintain a career planning portfolio.
      1. Standard 6: Students will understand the relationship between personal qualities, education and training, and the world of work. Examples of student competencies associated with this standard may include, but are not limited to:
      1. Students will understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success.
      2. Students will explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction.
      3. Students will identify personal preferences and interests that influence career choices and success.
      4. Students will understand that the changing workplace requires lifelong learning and acquiring new skills.
      5. Students will describe the effect of work on lifestyles.
      6. Students will understand the importance of equity and access in career choice.
      7. Students will understand that work is an important and satisfying means of personal expression.
      8. Students will demonstrate how interests, abilities, and achievement relate to achieving personal, social, educational, and career goals.
      9. Students will learn how to use conflict management skills with peers and adults.
      10. Students will learn to work cooperatively with others as a team member.
      11. Students will apply academic and employment readiness skills in work-based learning situations such as internships, shadowing and mentoring experiences.
    1. Personal/Social Development. The content standards for personal/social development guide the school counseling program to provide the foundation for personal and social growth as studentsí progress through school and into adulthood. The personal/social development content standards are:
      1. Standard 7: Students will acquire the attitudes, knowledge and interpersonal skills to help them understand and respect self and others. Examples of student competencies associated with this standard may include, but not limited to :
      1. Students will develop a positive attitude toward self as a unique and worthy person.
      2. Students will identify personal values, attitudes and beliefs.
      3. Students will learn the goal setting process.
      4. Students will understand change as a part of growth.
      5. Students will identify and express feelings.
      6. Students will distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behaviors.
      7. Students will recognize personal boundaries, rights, and privacy needs.
      8. Students will understand the need for self-control and how to practice it.
      9. Students will demonstrate cooperative behavior in groups.
      10. Students will identify personal strengths and assets.
      11. Students will identify and discuss changing personal and social roles.
      12. Students will identify and recognize changing family roles.
      13. Students will recognize the rights and responsibilities of all persons.
      14. Students will respect alternative points of view.
      15. Students will recognize and respect individual, ethnic and cultural differences.
      16. Students will use effective communication skills.
      17. Students will recognize that communication involves speaking, listening and non-verbal behavior.
      18. Students will learn how to communicate effectively.
      19. Students will learn how to make and keep friends.
      1. Standard 8: Students will make decisions, set goals, and take necessary actions to achieve goals. Examples of student competencies associated with this standard may include, but are not limited to:
      1. Students will use a decision-making and problem-solving model.
      2. Students will understand consequences of decisions and choices.
      3. Students will identify alternative solutions to a problem.
      4. Students will develop effective coping skills for dealing with problems.
      5. Students will demonstrate when, where, and how to seek help for solving problems and making decisions.
      6. Students will know how to apply conflict resolution skills.
      7. Students will know when peer pressure is influencing a decision.
      8. Students will identify long- and short-term goals.
      9. Students will identify alternative ways of achieving goals.
      10. Students will use persistence and perseverance in acquiring knowledge and skills.
      11. Students will develop an action plan to set and achieve realistic goals.
      1. Standard 9: Students will understand safety and survival skills. Examples of student competencies associated with this standard may include, but are not limited to:
      1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of personal information (e.g., telephone number, home address, emergency contact).
      2. Students will learn about the relationship between rules, laws, safety and the protection of an individualís rights.
      3. Students will learn the difference between appropriate and inappropriate physical contact.
      4. Students will demonstrate the ability to assert boundaries, rights and personal privacy.
      5. Students will differentiate between situations requiring peer support and situations requiring adult professional help.
      6. Students will identify resource people in the school and community and know how to seek their help.
      7. Students will apply effective problem solving and decision-making skills to make safe and healthy choices.
      8. Students will learn about the emotional and physical dangers of substance use and abuse.
      9. Students will learn how to cope with peer pressure.
      10. Students will learn techniques for managing stress and conflict.
      11. Students will learn coping skills for managing life events.

8. Responsibility

8.1 The West Virginia School Guidance and Counseling Guide will be used as a resource for counseling professional development and planning activities.

8.2 By September 1, 2003, the Summers County School system will submit for approval the Summers County comprehensive developmental guidance policy.

8.3 The Summers County guidance and counseling program will be included in the unified school and county improvement plan.

8.4 The assessment of the current school counseling practice will identify measures of success for student competencies in each of the three areas of academic, career and personal/social. The assessment of the counseling program will be made with data the county/school collects regularly such as but not limited to attendance, discipline referrals, suspension/expulsion, test scores, detention rates, dropouts, safe school violations, harassment incidences, graduation rates, and tardiness. Individual schools will then develop evaluation methods to be used with the specific student competencies that were identified each year as priorities for each of the three areas: academic, career and personal/social.